Splash Pad in Kingman

The popular Kingman Splash Pad, which cools off people of all ages in the summer, is powered by solar panels that generate electricity all year long atop a donated shade structure from UniSource Energy Services.

The ramada opened last summer next to the free Splash Pad, providing shade and picnic space for visitors at Cecil Davis Park. The panels produce enough energy to run the pad’s fountains. The Splash Pad is now open seven-days-a-week for the summer from 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

“It’s a very good addition to the park,” said Mike Meersman, Kingman’s Director of Parks and Recreation. “It’s busy from sunup to sundown when it’s open in summer.”

UES donated the 5.49 kilowatt photovoltaic structure, which generates about 10,000 kilowatt-hours per year, to the city of Kingman.

“The ramada provides a gathering place for families to take cover from the sun while they enjoy the Splash Pad,” said Nikole White, Program Manager of Renewable and Demand Side Resources. “The structure also provides our community with renewable resources.”

The city has since doubled the ramada’s size, adding a second section to the roof without solar panels. Situated between the Splash Pad and soccer fields, the structure holds a barbecue grill and three picnic tables, making it a popular place for birthday parties. Children often use the Splash Pad as a summer camp activity.

Kingman Parks and Recreation rents out the ramada for large groups and parties.

“This adds to our ability to keep costs down for our residents,” Meersman said.

The nonprofit Venture Club of Kingman raised funds to build the Splash Pad, which opened in 2016 and was donated to the city.

Several contracting companies discounted their services and donated supplies for the project: DeVault Electric, Acton Welding, Becker Construction, Desert Construction, Truelove Plumbing, Consolidated Electrical Distributors and Independent Electrical Supply.

“The fact that so many people came together for a great cause – our community – and stepped up to make this concept a reality is phenomenal,” White said. “They saw the importance of the project.”